U2 Songs of Innocence Pre-Order Physical LP and Audio CD (Amazon) – Out Oct 14, 2014

U2.com

http://www.u2.com/news/title/cover-story

Amazon.com USA

5  September  2014
Cover Story – U2.com

The band have completed the artwork for next month’s physical release of Songs of Innocence.

The visuals reflect the new songs and their inspiration in the early years of U2 as teenagers in Dublin.

Glen Luchford’s striking cover image of Larry Mullen Jr, protecting his 18year old son, resonates with the band’s iconic 1980 debut album Boy – and the album War, three years later.

Both featured the face of a child, Peter Rowen, the younger brother of Guggi, Bono’s childhood friend growing up on Cedarwood Road.

‘We’ve always been about community in U2, about family and friends,’ explains Bono. ‘Songs Of Innocence is the most intimate album we’ve ever made. With this record we were looking for the raw, naked and personal, to strip everything back.’

The idea of the unique relationship between a parent and child, the image of a father and son, came from the band. The shoot with Larry and his son was initially an experiment but everyone loved it as a visual metaphor for the record.

If you know the album, reflects Bono, you’ll see the themes in the visual language, how ‘holding on to your own innocence is a lot harder than holding on to someone else’s.’

The physical release of Songs of Innocence on October 13th comes in three formats which are available for pre-order here and through Island Records, and U2.com.
Pre-order digital here.

Deluxe, 2 CD Format which comes with 2 x 16 page booklets, the 11 track album on CD1 plus additional tracks on CD2 including a 6-song acoustic session along with Lucifer’s Hands, The Crystal Ballroom, The Troubles (Alternative Version) and Sleep Like A Baby Tonight (Alternative Perspective Mix by Tchad Blake).

2 LP 180gram White Vinyl Format featuring the 11 track album on sides 1, 2 & 3 with bonus track The Crystal Ballroom 12″ Mix on side 4.

Single CD Format with a 24-page booklet along with the 11 track album.

TIME MAGAZINE Exclusive: U2 and Apple Have Another Surprise for You @U2

 

U2 TIMEU2 on the cover of TIME’s Sept. 29 International edition.TIME/Sebastian Kim

The four members of the legendary Irish band tell TIME about another new album in the works—and its secret Apple project that might just save the music industry

Many, many people really, really like U2. It hasn’t always been easy to remember that fact amid the caustic—and often hilarious—responses to the band’s Sept. 9 release ofSongs of Innocence. U2’s decision to team up with Apple to deliver the new album to every iTunes subscriber, unasked, raised valid questions about consumer choice and personal space in a world that routinely infringes on both. Moreover, while Apple paid U2 for the album, critics of the deal suggest this point may have been lost on iTunes customers who got it for free. If so, that messaging is certainly at odds with U2’s intentions.

As an article in the new issue of TIME reveals, Bono, Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr believe so strongly that artists should be compensated for their work that they have embarked on a secret project with Apple to try to make that happen, no easy task when free-to-access music is everywhere (no) thanks to piracy and legitimate websites such as YouTube. Bono tells TIME he hopes that a new digital music format in the works will prove so irresistibly exciting to music fans that it will tempt them again into buying music—whole albums as well as individual tracks. The point isn’t just to help U2 but less well known artists and others in the industry who can’t make money, as U2 does, from live performance. “Songwriters aren’t touring people,” says Bono. “Cole Porter wouldn’t have sold T-shirts. Cole Porter wasn’t coming to a stadium near you.”

TIME has been spending time with U2 in the studio, in London and Malibu and accompanied the band to the Apple launch in Cupertino. During the days that followed the launch, the band members maintained a semblance of cheer and they had reasons to feel good.Controversial as it was, the rollout of Songs of Innocence catapulted the band’s back catalogue into the charts again. By Sept. 18 Apple said that 38 million people had accessed Songs, downloading the album or streaming it. For every scathing tweet, U2 got positive feedback from a happy fan or a new listener. The band is—rightly—proud of its latest work, yet the backlash didn’t go unnoticed. “It’s like everyone’s vomiting whatever their first impression is,” said Clayton at one point, bemused rather than self-pitying.

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